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Call signs of radio stations

Each licensed amateur radio station has a registration number, a call sign. The first one or two letters are specific to a country. Here are a few call signs of well-known Scout station that can often be contacted:

HB9S - World Scout Bureau, Geneva, Switzerland

K2BSA - Boy Scouts of America, National Office, Dallas, USA

JA1YSS - Boy Scouts of Japan, National Office, Tokyo, Japan

PA6JAM - Scouting Nederland, National station, Leusden, Netherlands

5Z4KSA - Boy Scouts of Kenya, Paxtu station, Nyeri, Kenya

VK1BP - Scout Association of Australia, National station, Canberra, Australia

GB2GP - Scout Association, Gilwell Park, London, United Kingdom

Call sign of the World Scout Bureau

The World Scout Bureau operates its own amateur radio station with the call sign HB9S. There is a permanent radio room in the office building of the Bureau in the centre of Geneva. The station is on the air regularly at Scout nets. During the JOTA weekend, HB9S will operate most of the Saturday and Sunday with short breaks during the night.

Transmitters will be on the air simultaneously on the 10/15/20 metre, 160/80/40 metre and 0.7/2 metre bands. The World JOTA Team is usually assisted by World Bureau staff and an international team of scout radio amateurs to operate HB9S.

Making a contact with HB9S takes some patience in practice. Many stations are calling at the same time. Please follow the instructions given by the operators and do not interfere with ongoing contacts. The operators will do the best they can to make contact with scout stations worldwide and speak to Scouts in as many languages as possible.